360º Immersive Video

Tasmania’s Derwent River is a natural and technologically altered water system of beauty and fascination that encompasses a remarkable range of environments. The entire watershed is fractal in structure and complex: it is rich in natural history (geomorphology, botany, and zoology), and in situ artefacts that provide information from the Aboriginal period back to more than 30,000 years ago, and from colonial settlement up to 200 years ago, including historical records, images, and settler buildings. Structures in the environment such as dams, power stations, suburbs, and factories, as well as records and representations from the state’s pioneering hydroelectric schemes, provide information about the industrial period up to the present. Environmental data from organisations including Hydro Tasmania and the Bureau of Meterology sensor network provide measures of climatic conditions, river flows and levels, and water quality.

 

The aim of the Derwent project is to create new aesthetic models for representing a multilayered landscape over time, conveying its rich layering of information with clarity and impact. One of our approaches is the development of a highly portable means of image and sound capture that immerses the viewer in the remote environment of the Derwent – and conveys the embodied experience of being in the river. We are applying this approach to produce four-channel multi-screen panoramic video works. To create an imbedded viewpoint and allow the environment to be an active agency in the delivery of these new kinds of representations, much of our 360º imagery is being recorded at water level itself. To do this we shoot with multiple camera arrays from floating capture platforms such as small watercraft moving on the surface of the river – to evoke a sense of immersion in the river flow. Our capture approach is partially generative in that the form of the imagery reflects the energy of the environmental forces of the river system itself as evidenced through the drift of the capture platform, driven by localised air and water flows on the river’s passage from source to sea.

Taster for Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery exhibition "The Derwent" opening July 27, 2017. Excerpt sketch from "Watershed 2011-17", 4 channel synchronised video and sound projection.

Taster for Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery exhibition "The Derwent" opening July 27, 2017. Excerpt sketch from "Watershed 2011-17", 4 channel synchronised video and sound projection.

Taster for Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery exhibition "The Derwent" opening July 27, 2017. Excerpt sketch from "Watershed 2011-17", 4 channel synchronised video and sound projection.

Lake King William, 2 mornings,  2011-06-28 + 2012-04-24 showing water level change in 10 months, four-channel synchronised HD video

Lake King William, 2 mornings, 2011-11-25 + 2012-04-25 showing water level change in six months, four-channel synchronised HD video

Lake King William, Four Mornings, 2011, four-channel synchronised HD video